Monday, September 2, 2013

August Fruits of my Labor

I didn't want August to just fade into the annals of photographic history, so on this Labor Day Holiday in September, I thought I'd take a look back at last month's progress in my redeemed hellstrip to see the fruits of my spring labor.

 Here is a picture of the "before" in January 
and the "after" right after planting was completed in late May.


And here's August...

 The Blackfoot Daisies have grown huge!   
And they have the most lovely fragrance :-) 

Sometimes they can be a little cold tender in North Texas, but I am hoping since they are surrounded by all that rock and concrete that they won't go on strike come winter.


The annual 'Cora' Vincas and Moss Roses have done a nice job of filling empty spaces until the perennials fill in.   They have not taken a day off from blooming all summer!


The 'Walker's Low' Catmint and Zexmenia have been working hard all summer in this strip too.   They have definitely earned their keep in my garden!



The driveway end of the strip is progressing a little slower than the rest of the bed because of drier conditions, but the Pink Skullcap and Sedums should be back in business next spring.


Here are some August photos from the other side of the walk, where my garden has performed well all summer even in hot and humid working conditions.


The 'Azure Skies' Heliotrope and Blackfoot Daisies have grown so much, they have almost completely blocked passage down the sidewalk.


Mexican Mikweed (Asclepias curassavica) is on the job, waiting for the Monarch butterflies to report for duty next month.


I hope you were able to take a break from work today to enjoy the fruits of your labors.

Gardens are so rewarding, aren't they?!!

Toni :-)


20 comments:

  1. Congratulations on the wonderful fruits of your labor. It is very rewarding when they are all like that, the tiredness evaporates fast!

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  2. Beautiful beautiful! I was just wondering yesterday how it will went.

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  3. Well done! The hellstrip has just the right balance between flowers and rock accents. It isn't just a strip of lots of foliage and blooms -- it has structure because of the way you used the stones and because of the brick pillar (mailbox?) It came out really nice.

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  4. Looks fabulous! It has an English cottage garden feel to it. This is a wonderful alternative to a strip of grass. Very inspiring... yet again:)

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  5. Fabulous overall garden; I was watching the garden behind it as much as the "hell-strip". Your front garden must catch a lot of eyes coming down the street.

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    1. I meet new people all the time who walk by and stop to see the garden and visit :-) From March to May I'm sure they were wondering what that eyesore strip was going to turn into.

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  6. Very nice! You should be proud of that accomplishment! It's great fun to see the "before" and "after" shots! I agree--fabulous garden, overall.

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  7. Replies
    1. Thanks, Jim. It's all your fault. You gave me the initial inspiration on your blog :-)

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  8. Your garden is beautiful - and that's not easy in this heat! Your hellstrip looks fabulous!!! Love the plantings, and the addition of the rocks which add so much character. I bet your neighbors just love to walk past your house!

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    1. Thank you, Holley. I chose plants that just happen to love this heat. I knew it was going to be brutal out there. I am going to have to replant some sedums and move a few thyme plants around because they got covered by the huge blackfoot daisies and zexmenia, but that's okay. The neighbors seem to enjoy it. Just met some new neighbors the other day who walked by to see it and then brought some of their landscaping friends from the other side of the Metroplex (Plano). What's the point of doing all this if you can't share it with others -- it's so fun!!

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  9. I seriously wish I could hire you to help me with my garden. I always picture your garden when I'm redesigning mine but the results are never the same. I don't know what I'm doing wrong. Your hell strip is incredible.

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    1. Thanks, Tammy! I wish I could help you, too, but you can do this! Just think, easy mowing curves. Shape the lawn and the beds form themselves. Piece of cake.

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  10. Absolutely stunning. I have a quick question though. You said that you could not till the soil. Are you growing all of this in compost only?
    Great work.

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    1. Yep, compost only. I would imagine some of the roots have made it down to the native soil by now, and the worms over time will mix it all up.

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  11. Very nicely done and rewarding I'm sure. Tried blackfoot daisey here in Kansas, didn't fair well. I did see a variety in Wyoming which was native, must have!

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  12. Really, one of the prettiest gardens ever!

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  13. So lovely to see beautiful garden. Your flowers are pretty
    Greetings, http://kolorywogrodzie.blog.onet.pl

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  14. thanks for your share the article, your post very nice

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  15. Just seeing this page. Found your rock garden landscaping on Pinterest recently and was encouraged to get some 'dirt under my nails'. Fun, fun and more fun. I prefer poking around in the garden to housework. God's shows up best there, even though I see Him in many amazing ways.

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